Backyard Astro…

I follow a youtube channel called AstroBackyard… a nice Canadian fella called Trevor who does astrophotography from his actual back yard in a fairly heavily light polluted area…

I have to say he is a little more dedicated to his hobby than I could force myself to be at this time but his work is very inspirational considering and gives me some hope that I will be able to get some half decent images once I can be actually bothered to get out there…

First step will be to cut down the overhanging branches of the neighbours hedge thing… this is quite key to me getting polar alignment in my back garden (not yard as I am not american or canadian) as they currently block my line of sight to Polaris…

Next will be to get enthusiastic about going out late at night after watching the weather for weeks on end hoping for a clear night when the moon is not out…

The overhanging branches are work in progress (seeing as a couple have managed to break off from the weight of the recent snow we had) but as tonight was a clear night and it wasn’t actually that cold I decided to just run out and grab a wide field shot of the Orion star formation…

One thing I was quite keen to try out was the SkyTech CLS (City Light Suppression) filter I bought a little while back… The SkyTech CLS filter is a clip in filter for Canon EOS DSLR’s primarily APS-C crop sensor bodies as the mirror on full frame bodies would hit a filter like this…

SkyTech do two types of this filter… the CLS and the CLS-CCD… the latter is designed for astro modified bodies where the IR filter has been removed… unmodified bodies like mine just need the CLS version…

The filter clips inside the body like this…
Backyard Astro...

The difference it makes is quite astounding… this is an unedited image taken without the filter using my 6D/24mm Samyang combo… Manual, f2, 15secs, ISO1600…
Backyard Astro...

…and edited…
Backyard Astro...

Now a shot from my 7D2 with the SkyTech CLS filter fitted and the 24mm Samyang… obviously framing is a little different as its now 38mm effective focal length being a crop body… Manual, f2, 8secs, ISO1600…
Backyard Astro...

…and (rather badly) edited… (this shot was 10secs not 8secs like the previous one)
Backyard Astro...

Couple of things I have taken away from this…

The 7D2/CLS filter/24mm combo would benefit from longer exposures plus stacked images to get the best out of it… I had to use a quicker shutter speed with this as the focal length was longer so the tracker will need to come out next time I think…

While the light pollution was suppressed the final image doesn’t really stand out… poor old Orion gets lost in the other stars a bit so arguably the more light polluted image was better under these shooting conditions…

The CLS filter will definitely help tracked long exposure imaging of pretty objects like nebula and galaxies so that is next of the to do list…

I also need to practice more editing in Photoshop as the tools in Lightroom are more aimed at traditional photos… astro photos tend to start life as unusable you then have to use quite a few tricks to get the final image from them… the filter also leaves the stars with a red colour cast… this can be edited out (which I mostly managed) but there is a lot more to this than I have experience of so far so more reading and watching then doing in the new year… Trevor covers a lot of this off in some of his videos too 🙂

Please do check Trevors channel out on youtube though… very cool stuff 🙂
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3npsPixgoi_xLdCg9J-LQ

<tuffty/>

This entry was posted in Astrophotography, Photography and tagged , .

3 Comments

  1. Lynwen Edwards 17th December 2017 at 10:57 am #

    I liked the second photo best.. you rambled on a little too much about your bush at the start but it was worth pushing through to the end 😉

    I’ll bring my camera in next week and you can teach me how to use it lol

    I love astronomy photography

    • <tuffty/>
      <tuffty/> 17th December 2017 at 11:34 am #

      Rambling is my forte (as you know) 🙂

      The second image is the typical result of light polluted non tracked imaging… using the 500 rule gives you 20 seconds exposure time on the full frame body before star trialing is apparent and these shots were taken at ISO 1600 wit an aperture of f2

      The crop body was a 13 second exposure so would benefit (arguably) from a higher ISO again to gain a couple of stops…

      But if I use the tracker I can drop the ISO down to something like ISO800 and take a much longer exposure to capture more detail

      • Lynwen Edwards 17th December 2017 at 11:45 am #

        I know what iso is I’ll show you as much as I know on my camera but this is exactly the type of photography I wish I knew HOW to do… I mostly use th “automatic” setting *face palm*. And the apature setting

        I absolutely love your moon

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